Storage in a safety cabinet for Combustibles is easy, get pricing today by calling 1-866-867-0306

Flammable Liquid Storage Requirements for Class 1A, 1B, 1C

Flammable liquids are defined by OSHA as any with a flashpoint below 100 F. They are defined in three classes. Many of these liquids have storage requirements in flammable liquid storage cabinets. Depending on the safety requirements and compliance of your local OSHA jurisdiction, certain class flammable liquids may need Securall flammable safety cabinets that are designed for cans, drums, chemical storage and more.

pricing  Flammable Liquid Storage Requirements for Class 1A, 1B, 1C pricing

Storage in a safety cabinet for Flammable liquids is easy, get prices today by calling 1-866-867-0306  Flammable Liquid Storage Requirements for Class 1A, 1B, 1C l136 flammable storage cabinet laboratory osha compliance

Storage in a safety cabinet for Combustibles is easy, get pricing today by calling 1-866-867-0306

CLASS 1A – Flash point below 73 F, boiling point below 100 F and could require OSHA approved safety cabinets that meet flammable liquid storage compliance requirements.

acetaldehyde

  • chemical synthesis
  • production of perfumes
  • polyester resins
  • dyes
  • fruit and fish preservative
  • flavoring agent
  • denaturant for alcohol
  • solvent in rubber, tanning, and paper industries

collodion

  • wart remover
  • liquid bandage products
  • glueing electrodes to the head for electro-encephalography
  • theatrical makeup
  • cleaning of optics such as telescope mirrors

ethyl ether

  • solvent in production of cellulose plastics
  • starting fluid for gasoline
  • laboratory solvent

ethyl chloride

  • treating cellulose to make ethyl cellulose
  • mild topical anesthetic

methyl ethyl ether (methoxyethane)

  • anesthetic

pentane

  • solvent in laboratory use

petroleum ether (benzine)

  • main ingredient in label removers
  • laboratory solvent

propylene oxide

  • production of polyurethane plastics
  • hydrolyzed into propylene glycol
  • pasteurizing raw almonds
  • glow fuel for model aircraft and surface vehicles
  • preparation of biological samples for electron microscopy

CLASS 1B Liquids = Flash point below 73 F, boiling point at or above 100 F and may require OSHA approved safety cabinets for proper storage.

acetone

  • solvent
  • thinning polyester resin
  • removing rosin flux after soldering
  • paints and varnishes

benzene

  • chemical synthesis
  • rubbers
  • lubricants
  • dyes
  • detergents
  • pharmaceuticals
  • explosives
  • pesticides

butyl alcohol (butanol)

  • biofuel
  • solvent
  • base for perfumes

ethyl acetate

  • solvent
  • diluent
  • circuit board cleaner
  • nail varnish remover
  • decaffeination of coffee beans and tea leaves
  • insect asphyxiant for use in bug collecting

ethyl alcohol (ethanol)

  • alcoholic beverages
  • antiseptic
  • antitussive
  • antidote to methanol poisoning
  • engine fuel and fuel additive
  • rocket fuel
  • commercial fuel cells
  • household heating
  • solvent

gasoline

  • fuel

methylcyclohexane

  • organic solvent
  • component in jet fuel surrogate blends

toluene

  • solvent
  • octane booster
  • breaking open red blood cells in order to extract hemoglobin in biochemical experiments

CLASS 1C Flammable Liquids for Storage = Flashpoint at or above 73 F, boiling point below 100 F.

amyl acetate

  • flavoring agent
  • paint lacquer and solvent
  • preparation of penicillin

amyl alcohol

  • solvents

dibutyl ether

  • solvents

isopropanol

  • solvent for coatings and industrial processes
  • household use
  • personal care products
  • keyboard, LCD, and laptop cleaning
  • whiteboard cleaner
  • disinfecting pads
  • preventative for swimmer’s ear
  • removing brake fluid traces from hydraulic braking systems
  • DNA extraction

methyl alcohol (methanol)

  • chemical synthesis
  • biodiesel component
  • fuel
  • solvent
  • wastewater treatment
  • camping / boating stove fuel

styrene

  • plastic and foam production

turpentine

  • solvent
  • additive to cleaning and sanitary products

xylene

  • solvent
  • component of ink, rubber, and adhesives
  • paint thinners and varnishes
  • cleaning agent
  • dissolves gutta percha, a material used in endodontics
  • combined with dry ice to make a bath that cools reaction vessels in laboratories

Combustible Liquids & Storage Cabinet Requirements

Combustible liquids are defined by OSHA as any liquid having a flashpoint at or above 100 F. They are divided into three categories and each have special requirements to meet OSHA Compliant storage regulations. Flammable storage cabinets are designed for compliance in accordance to OSHA and NFPA rules and are available in a variety of sizes and capacities for Class II, IIIA and IIIB combustibles storage and safety.

pricing  Combustible Liquids & Storage Cabinet Requirements pricing

CLASS II = Any combustible liquid having a flashpoint at or above 100 F, and below 140 F could require an OSHA approved flammable storage cabinet or safety cabinet. 

Storage in a safety cabinet for Combustibles is easy, get pricing today by calling 1-866-867-0306  Combustible Liquids & Storage Cabinet Requirements l136 flammable storage cabinet laboratory osha compliance

Storage in a safety cabinet for Combustibles is easy, get pricing today by calling 1-866-867-0306

furfural

  • chemical feedstock
  • solvent

camphor oil

  • cooking additive
  • embalming fluids
  • fireworks and explosives
  • mothballs
  • antimicrobials
  • slight local anesthetics

cyclohexane

  • calibration of differential scanning calorimetry instruments

Fuel Oil No. 44

  • jet fuel

methyl lactate

  • cosmetics

hydrazine

  • gas forming agent in air bags
  • propellant on board space vehicles
  • production of spandex fibers
  • explosives
  • artillery propellant

mineral spirits (varsol)

  • paint thinner
  • cleaner for screen printing equipment
  • inside for liquid filled compasses & gauges
  • regripping golf clubs
  • automotive fuel additive
  • cutting fluid for precision lathes

kerosene

  • jet engine fuel
  • cooking and lighting fuel
  • home heating fuel
  • cooking
  • crystal storage
  • solvent

CLASS IIIA = any liquid having a flashpoint at or above 140 F, and below 200 F qualifies for Class IIIA Flammable and combustible storage cabinets. Local OSHA jurisdiction will have the final say on which safety cabinet or flammable storage cabinet requirement you must maintain.

analine

  • rubber
  • pesticides
  • explosives
  • pharmaceuticals
  • preparation of indigo dye

butyl cellosolve (2-butoxyethanol)

  • solvent
  • fracturing (fracking) fluids
  • drilling stabilizer

cyclohexanol

  • feedstock
  • solvent

furfural

  • feedstock
  • solvent

isophorone

  • solvent
  • printing inks
  • paints
  • adhesives
  • copolymers
  • coatings
  • finishings
  • pesticides
  • wood preservative
  • floor sealant

nitrobenzene

  • shoe and floor polishes
  • leather dressings
  • paint solvents
  • perfume for soaps
  • aniline synthesis

CLASS IIIB = any liquid having a flashpoint at or above 200 F may require a Flammable storage cabinet or safety cabinet to be OSHA compliant.

cellosolve solvent

  • solvent

ethylene glycol

  • antifreeze
  • convective heat transfer
  • making of polyester fibers
  • shoe polish
  • inks
  • dyes

glycerine (glycol)

  • humectant
  • solvent
  • sweetener
  • food preservative
  • food filler in low fat foods
  • industrial lubricants
  • cough syrups
  • elixirs
  • expectorants
  • toothpastes
  • mouthwash
  • skin care products
  • hair care products
  • shaving cream
  • soaps
  • personal lubricants
  • e-cigarette liquid
  • fuel
  • as a water substitute in the film industry

DEA Approved Drug Storage Cages & Requirements

FEDERAL DRUG ENFORCEMENT AGENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FOUR-WALL DRUG STORAGE CAGES AND SECURITY PARTITIONS.

When it comes to the secure storage of Schedule III, IV and V controlled substances, many practitioners and non-practitioners utilize a Style 840 wire partition cage or secure storage area partition.

Style 840 Wire Panels are used for partition walls and storage cages of Schedule III, IV & V. These can be designed to any size or height up to 30'  DEA Approved Drug Storage Cages & Requirements DEA Controlled Substance Drug Storage Cages prices

Style 840 Wire Panels are used for partition walls and storage cages of Schedule III, IV & V. These can be designed to any size or height up to 30′ feet. For more information call 1-866-867-0306

The Federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has established a strict guideline for installation of cages within facilities with the specific intention of utilizing these apparatuses in the storage of Schedule III, IV, and V pharmaceuticals. These regulations can be found in Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations under Part 1301, as well as all storage requirements for any type of device.

With special consideration to cages and security partitions, the exact regulations can be located in Title 21 CFR 1301.72(b)(4), and are broken down as follows;

A cage locate within a building or premises must meet the following specifications

(i) Wall must be constructed of a minimum No. 10 gauge steel fabric mounted on steel posts which are:

  1. at least 1” in diameter.
  2. set in concrete or installed with lag bolts that are pinned or brazed, and
  3. placed no more than 10 feet apart with horizontal one and one-half inch reinforcements every 60”.

(ii) Have a mesh construction with openings no more than two and one-half inches across the square.

(iii) Have ceilings constructed of the same material, or in the alternative, a cage shall be erected which reaches and is securely attached to the structural ceiling of the building. A lighter gauge mesh may be used for the ceiling of large enclosed areas if the walls are at least 14 feet in height.

(iv) The cage is equipped with a door constructed of No. 10 gauge steel fabric on a metal door flange, and in all other respects conforms to all the requirements of 21 CFR 1301.72(b)(3)(ii), and

(v) The cage is equipped with an alarm system which upon unauthorized entry transmits a signal directly to a central protection agency or a local or state police agency, each having a legal duty to respond, or to a 24 hour control station operated by the registrant, or to such other source of protection as the Administrator may approve.

For more information on design, build and installation of storage cages and wire wall partitions that meet DEA Approved standards, regulations and security requirements, call Toll Free 1-866-867-0306

 

 

Etorphine-Hydrochloride / Diprenorphine Use and Storage Compliance

Etorphine-Hydrochloride is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic that was first prepared in 1960 from the drug oripavine. Oripavine is an agonist drug, binding primarily with the mu gamma receptor to slow the transmission of pain to the brain. Etorphine is 1,000 to 3,000 times more powerful than morphine.

Due to the extreme potency, etorphine-hydrochloride is only prescribed for veterinary uses, and is only used in the treatment of extremely large animals such as elephants, and rhinoceros’. Etorphine is given as an intramuscular injection, and must be administered into a large muscle area (neck, shoulder, back, or hindquarters.)

Etorphine-hydrochloride is has a unique relationship to its “sister” drug, Diprenorphine (sold under the brand name “Revivon.”) Diprenorphine is an opioid receptor antagonist, and acts in a reversing effect of Etorphine. When administered in proportion to the amount of etorphine used (1.3 times the dosage), diprenorphine will counteract the effect of etorphine nearly as quickly as they became evident.

One drawback of the use of etorphine-hydrochloride is that it is extremely toxic to humans, even in the tiniest of doses. Due to this potentially life-threatening side effect of etorphine, it is never sold without the companion doseage of diprenorphine, and the dosage must be prepared and be ready to be administered together. The human antidote is known as naloxone, and is also sent with requested doses of etorphine, and must also be prepared along with any doses as though it were going to be administered.

While a high incidence of side effects (including cardiopulmonary depression) have taken the combination out of favor of many veterinarians, there are still many advantages to its use. The main advantage to etorphine-hydrochloride is how quickly it takes effect, and transversely how quickly diprenorphine can reverse the doseage. The high potency and quickness of the etorphine-hydrochloride / diprenorphine combination means that it is used frequently in treating large animals when rapid onset and rapid recovery are crucial.

Storage Compliance Requirements and Approved Safes & Containers.

Due to the extreme nature of the effect of etorphine-hydrochloride on human beings, the U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration Office of Diversion Control has explicit regulations for storing this drug. Under Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, §1301.75 “Physical Security Controls for Practitioners” part (e) states, “Carfentanil, etorphine hydrochloride, and diprenorphine shall be stored in a safe or steel cabinet equivalent to a U.S. Government Class V security container.”

In order to maintain compliance with DEA regulations, a Class V (Class 5) security container must meet the following definition;

Maintain storage compliance for ETORPHINE-HYDROCHLORIDE / DIPRENORPHINE  with a GSA Approved and DEA Approved Safe or Security Container.  Etorphine-Hydrochloride / Diprenorphine Use and Storage Compliance class v security container carfentanil

Maintain storage compliance for ETORPHINE-HYDROCHLORIDE / DIPRENORPHINE with a GSA Approved and DEA Approved Safe or Security Container.

A class 5 GSA Approved uninsulated security container and protection provided is:

  • 20 man-hours against surreptitious entry
  • 10 man-minutes against forced entry
  • 20 man-hours against radiological attack
  • 30 man-minutes against covert entry.

Note that all of our Class 5 Security Containers meet the FF-L-2740 Lock Specification and are approved for the storage of controlled substances under Schedule I or Schedule Compliance requirements.

For more information on pricing and identifying the best safe for your compliance needs, call -1-866-867-0306

Maintain storage compliance for ETORPHINE-HYDROCHLORIDE / DIPRENORPHINE  with a GSA Approved and DEA Approved Safe or Security Container.

CARFENTANIL Uses and Storage Compliance

Carfentanil is an analogue (or copy) of the commonly prescribed drug fentanyl. Carfentanil was designed in 1974 by a team at Janssen Pharmaceutica, which included Phil Janssen. The potency of Carfentanil is 10,000 times greater than morphine, and 100 times greater than fentanyl. It is one of the most potent opioid drugs manufactured today, and THE most potent opioid used commercially.

Carfentanil activity is noted in humans at a dosage as low as one microgram. Due to its extreme opioid effects, sufentanil (which is ten to twenty times less potent than Carfentanil) is the maximum strength of the drug used in the treatment of humans. Due to the extreme anesthetic effects, Carfentanil is used as a general anesthetic for large animals, and is sold under the name brand and generic labels of; Carfentanil, Carfentanil, Carfentanilum, Wildnil, and Carfentanyl.

Carfentanil is fast-acting, and extremely potent. It is most effective when delivered intramuscularly. Due to it’s low dose-to-effect ratio, it is easily used in darts when sedating wild (and sometimes dangerous) animals.

The opioid system of the brain consists of three gamma protein-coupled receptors; mu, delta, and kappa. Carfentanil acts primarily on the mu receptors, but also has some minor effects on the kappa and the gamma. The drug also acts as an agonist. An agonist is a chemical than binds to a receptor and activates the receptor to a biological response. In Carfentanil, this response occurs when calcium ion currents are released, potassium ion conductance is increased, and neurotransmitter release is inhibited. This combination of chemical reactions induces extreme sedation and analgesia. Carfentanil exerts its properties mainly on the central nervous system. Less extreme side effects are respiratory depression, depression of the cough reflex, and constriction of the pupils.

Security Requirements for Storage

Due to the extreme potency of Carfentanil, the U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration Office of Diversion Control has explicit regulations for storing this drug. Under Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, §1301.75 “Physical Security Controls for Practitioners” part (e) states, “Carfentanil, etorphine hydrochloride, and diprenorphine shall be stored in a safe or steel cabinet equivalent to a U.S. Government Class V security container.”

In order to maintain compliance with DEA regulations, a Class V security container must meet the following definition;

A GSA Approved Class 5 Security Container is approved for the storage of Carfentanil  CARFENTANIL Uses and Storage Compliance class v security container carfentanil

A GSA Approved Class 5 Security Container is approved for the storage of Carfentanil

A class 5 safe, file cabinet or container is an uninsulated security container and protection provided is:

  • 20 man-hours against surreptitious entry
  • 10 man-minutes against forced entry
  • 20 man-hours against radiological attack
  • 30 man-minutes against covert entry.

It is important to note that different rules for storage and compliance with Schedule I and Schedule II narcotics and controlled substances may be subject to different storage requirements depending on your status as a practitioner or non-practitioner.

For more information please call 1-866-867-0306 and speak to a DEA Approved Safe Consultant and Advisor.

NEW JERSEY MEDICINAL MARIJUANA STORAGE REGULATIONS

On January 1st of 2010 then Governor of New Jersey, Jon Corzine approved Chapter 307 of the Constitution of the State of New Jersey. This portion of the constitution was know as the New Jersey Compassionate Use Act. While the law itself was passed in 2010, current Governor Chris Christie fought the addition of the act to New Jersey law.

In 2011, New Jersey residents were granted the right to legally pursue the use of medicinal marijuana supported by several findings;

  • Modern research has discovered beneficial use of marijuana in treating or alleviating certain conditions. This was based on the findings of the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine March 1999.
  • According to the Unites States Sentencing Committee and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 99 of every 100 marijuana arrests are made via state, not federal, law. The changing of State law would protect the citizens of New Jersey from prosecution with regard to sanctioned medical use of marijuana.
  • Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington already offered protections for medicinal marijuana users inside their borders.
  • States are not required to enforce federal law or prosecute their citizens for federally banned activities. Therefor, New Jersey is not in violation of any federal statutes or laws.
  • A distinction must be made between medicinal and recreational marijuana in order to protect the citizens of New Jersey who consume marijuana in legally sanctioned ways.

New Jersey is very atypical in the structure of its medical marijuana storage and containment law, with each facility having flexible storage regulations based upon the amount of medicinal marijuana contained within each separate dispensary. If a dispensary possesses a small enough amount of marijuana that containment of all of the product will fit into a ul listed burglary resistant safe, then New Jersey adheres to the guidelines established by the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) law with regard to storage and containment of medicinal marijuana. DEA regulations under Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 1301 specify that, in the instance of small amounts of the drug permit, a safe or steel cabinet may be used. The safe or cabinet must provide;

  • 30 man -minutes against surreptitious entry
  • 10 man-minutes against forced entry
  • 20 man-hours against lock manipulation
  • 20 man-hours against radiological techniques

The Code also states that if a safe or steel cabinet weighs less than 750 lbs., it must be bolted or cemented to the floor in such a way that it cannot be removed. Depending on the quantity and type of the substance(s) being stored, the safe or cabinet must be equipped with an alarm system which, upon attempted break-in, shall transmit a signal directly to a central protection company or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond, or a 24-hour control station operated by the registrant, or such other protection.

 

CONNECTICUT MEDICINAL MARIJUANA STORAGE REQUIREMENTS

On May 5th of 2012, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy signed the passage of House Bill 5389. When this bill was enacted on June 1st, 2012, the State of Connecticut allowed its patients with approved medical conditions the option of using medicinal marijuana as a legal treatment option within state borders.

Chapter 420F of Connecticut Statutes provides the restrictions and regulations of “Palliative Use of Marijuana.” Included in these rules and regulations are limitations on possession and dispensing of marijuana, approved conditions for treatment using marijuana, and many other regulatory concerns.

Section 21a-408h (G) specifically applies to the laws governing dispensaries with regard to storage and security. Section 21a-408h (G) mandates establishing a “health, safety, and security for licensed dispensaries, which may include, but not be limited to  (i) the ability to maintain adequate control against diversion, theft, and loss of marijuana acquired by the licensed dispensary, and (ii) the ability to maintain the knowledge, understanding, judgment, procedures, security, controls and ethics to ensure optimal safety and accuracy in the distributing, dispensing, and use of palliative marijuana.”

The state of Connecticut also mandates in Chapter 420F that marijuana was to be rescheduled from a Schedule I narcotic to a Schedule II narcotic. Connecticut adheres strictly to Federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) law with regard to storage and containment of medicinal marijuana and all other scheduled narcotics. DEA regulations under Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 1301 specify that, in the instance of small amounts of the drug permit, a safe or steel cabinet may be used. The safe or cabinet must provide;

  • 30 man -minutes against surreptitious entry
  • 10 man-minutes against forced entry
  • 20 man-hours against lock manipulation
  • 20 man-hours against radiological techniques

The Code also states that if a safe or steel cabinet weighs less than 750 lbs., it must be bolted or cemented to the floor in such a way that it cannot be removed. Depending on the quantity and type of the substance(s) being stored, the safe or cabinet must be equipped with an alarm system which, upon attempted break-in, shall transmit a signal directly to a central protection company or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond, or a 24-hour control station operated by the registrant, or such other protection.

MASSACHUSETTS MEDICINAL MARIJUANA STORAGE AND CONTAINMENT

On November 11th, 2012, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts answered Ballot Question 3, “An Initiative Petition for a Law for Humanitarian Medical Use of Marijuana” (Chapter 369) with an overwhelming 63.3% affirmative vote. This decision by the voters of Massachusetts effectively made the Massachusetts the 18th State in The Union (and the District of Columbia) to decriminalize the use of marijuana for medicinal uses in qualifying patients.

The “Implementation of An Act for Humanitarian Medical Use of Marijuana” (105 CMR 725.000) became law on January 1st, 2013. Statutes with regard to this implementation appear in sections 725.000 to 725.800. This piece of regulatory specifications include everything from definitions to physician prescribing rules and law.

Security and Operational Requirements appear in 105 CMR 725.105 under the heading “Operational Requirements for Registered Marijuana Dispensaries.” Part 725.105 part (4) specifically reflects that “storage of marijuana” shall be “in compliance with 105 CMR 725.110.” This specific piece of regulation is developed to establish compliance with regard to safes and vaults to be used in the storage of medicinal marijuana and marijuana infused products (MIPs).

With safe and vault storage concerned, 105 CMR 725.110 (A) (5-6) specifically states that dispensaries and other storage facilities must;

725.110 (A)

(5) Store all finished marijuana in a secure, locked safe or vault and in such a manner as to prevent diversion, theft and loss;

(6) Keep all safes, vaults, and other equipment or areas used for the production, cultivation, harvesting, processing, or storage of marijuana and MIPs securely locked and protected from entry, except for the actual time required to remove or replace marijuana.

Massachusetts adheres to Federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) law with regard to storage and containment of medicinal marijuana. DEA regulations under Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 1301 specify that, in the instance of small amounts of the drug permit, a safe or steel cabinet may be used. The safe or cabinet must provide;

  • 30 man -minutes against surreptitious entry
  • 10 man-minutes against forced entry
  • 20 man-hours against lock manipulation
  • 20 man-hours against radiological techniques

The Code also states that if a safe or steel cabinet weighs less than 750 lbs., it must be bolted or cemented to the floor in such a way that it cannot be removed. Depending on the quantity and type of the substance(s) being stored, the safe or cabinet must be equipped with an alarm system which, upon attempted break-in, shall transmit a signal directly to a central protection company or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond, or a 24-hour control station operated by the registrant, or such other protection.

DEA Approved safes and vaults for the storage of controlled substances can be outfitted with alarm system wiring, door contacts, S&G Group 1R locks to meet requirements and have a TL-15 or Class 5 GSA Approved Container security rating.

 

 

DELAWARE REGULATION AND STORAGE OF MEDICAL MARIJUANA

In 2011, the Delaware Division of Public Health enacted Title 16, Chapter 49A of the Delaware Code. This piece of legislature officially recognized the rights of citizens of the state of Delaware to purchase and consume marijuana for medical uses.

The State cited many reasons for legalizations of medical marijuana in § 4901A of The Delaware Code. Chief among them were;

  • the use of marijuana for medical uses being documented back 5,000 years.
  • a 1999 study by the Institute of Medicine showing therapeutic values for marijuana in treating a wide variety of mental and physical conditions.
  • at the time of enactment, over 350,000 patients in the United States are prescribed medicinal marijuana.
  • in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Report, it was discovered that in 99 out of 100 arrests made nationally for marijuana possession were in response to a federal, not state, law.
  • States are not required to adhere to Federal law under the Constitution of the Unites States of America, so citizens of Delaware are in no violation of state law, and therefore protected from penalization by this decision.

When Delaware made its legal decision regarding medicinal marijuana in 2021, the state approved 3 dispensaries to be opened, one in each county. As of 2014, only the first dispensary had been opened in Wilmington under the provision that it cultivate no more than 150 mature marijuana plants, and / or 1,500 ounces of marijuana at one time.

All sanctioned dispensaries in Delaware are required to adhere to the Federal Drug Administration standards regarding storage and containment of medicinal marijuana. Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 1301 specifies that, in the instance of small amounts of the drug permit, a safe or steel cabinet may be used. The safe or cabinet must provide;

  • 30 man -minutes against surreptitious entry
  • 10 man-minutes against forced entry
  • 20 man-hours against lock manipulation
  • 20 man-hours against radiological techniques

The Code also states that if a safe or steel cabinet weighs less than 750 lbs., it must be bolted or cemented to the floor in such a way that it cannot be removed. Depending on the quantity and type of the substance(s) being stored, the safe or cabinet must be equipped with an alarm system which, upon attempted break-in, shall transmit a signal directly to a central protection company or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond, or a 24-hour control station operated by the registrant, or such other protect

 

ILLINOIS MEDICAL CANNABIS REGULATIONS

On August 1st of 2013, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed into law the Illinois Medical Cannabis Pilot Program, which provided legislation for regulation of medicinal marijuana to the residents of the State of Illinois. The law took effect on January 1st, 2014, however, government regulated cultivation centers and dispensaries will not open until early 2015.

In the “findings” section of HB 0001 (which outlined the facts supporting the decriminalization of marijuana for medical use), the State of Illinois presented several arguments in favor of medical marijuana usage. Included were the following;

  • the use of marijuana for medical uses being documented back 5,000 years.
  • a 1999 study by the Institute of Medicine showing therapeutic values for marijuana in treating a wide variety of mental and physical conditions.
  • at the time of enactment, over 600,000 patients in the United States are prescribed medicinal marijuana.
  • in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Report, it was discovered that in 99 out of 100 arrests made nationally for marijuana possession were in response to a federal, not state, law.
  • States are not required to adhere to Federal law under the Constitution of the Unites States of America, so citizens of Illinois are in no violation of state law, and therefore protected from penalization by this decision.
  • It was to the advantage of the state to differentiate between “medical” and “non-medical” use of marijuana for the purpose of criminal prosecution.

The State of Illinois (as well as all other states in the Union that allow for protected use of medicinal marijuana) adheres to Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 1301 as enacted by the DEA. The Code specifies that, in the instance of small amounts of drugs permit, a safe or steel cabinet may be used in the storage of Class I drugs. This safe or cabinet must provide;

* 30 man-minutes against surreptitious entry

* 10 man-minutes against forced entry

* 20 man-hours against lock manipulation

* 20 man-hours against radiological techniques

The Code also states that if a safe or steel cabinet is less than weights less than 750 lbs., it must be bolted or cemented to the floor in such a way it cannot be removed. Also, depending on the quantities and type of the substances being stored, the safe or cabinet must be equipped with an alarm system which, upon attempted break-in, shall transmit a signal directly to a central protection company or a local or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond, or a 24-hour control station operated by the registrant, or such other protection. DEA approved safes and vaults for practitioners and non-practitioners such as wholesale, distribution, warehousing and manufacturing can be found here: http://www.safeandvault.com/solutions/dea-diversion-control-security-requirements.html